3 Keys to Marketing Your Business

Keesha Mayes
Keesha Mayes
'If you build it, they will come', is a false notion that is commonly held by new business owners. It takes considerably more thought and action to find customers, get them to buy what you are selling and keep them coming back for more.

Marketing is crucial to your business bottom line because it takes your services and products to the public. How else will the world know about your delicious muffins or fabulous jewelry line? So hunkering down and making a clear marketing plan is paramount to driving revenue to your business.

Black Baby Boomer Dreams (Show Me The Money!, Part II)

Beverly Mahone
Beverly Mahone
If there are more than nine million of us according to the 2004 US Census, why are there only a little more than two hundred thousand of us making $100,000 or more? Maybe it's because we were never meant to live the American Dream.

More than forty years after the end of the baby boom, black Americans born between 1946 and 1964 "are no better off relative to whites than their parents and grandparents" were in terms of income, according to a Duke University study. Black baby boomers have not closed the income gap, even though they have made strides says the researchers.

So what are the states where Black baby boomers are making at least $100,000?  Once again, the answers may surprise you.


The Black Anglo Saxon, Part II

Darryl James
Darryl James
A key characteristic of The Black Anglo Saxon is his comparison to a group of people he defines as "Niggers," who are all things wretched and all things horrible about the Black race. The Black Anglo Saxon defines "Niggerish" behavior and then assigns that behavior to some lower economic portion of the Black race.

However, the Black Anglo Saxon has a relationship with Niggers that is inextricably interdependent. In other words, the Black Anglo Saxon must have Niggers beneath him in order to define his exaltation above the Nigger experience.


What's The Greater Obstacle To Black Progress: No Black Agenda, or Too Many Blacks With An Agenda?

Anthony Samad
Anthony Samad
The Great (great) Frederick Douglass, once said, "If there is no struggle, there is no progress." Malcolm said, "We struggle in different ways" talking about the similarities between integrationist (access) and nationalist (identity) struggles for progress. . . . Certainly, the great leaders and change activists of the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries, and even in the Twenty-first century recognize the inherent relationship between struggle and progress. Yet, more than ever, the Black community, in the collective sense, has become increasingly conflicted about what the struggle is and what progress has been made.

A Culture of Mediocrity!

Monday Mover
Comatose...No. But close. Far too many folks are squeaking by through personal efforts enjoying the results of others labor. Quality is wished for but mediocrity is accepted if it passes the dollar generator or WIIFM phrase some seem to love. Don't believe me; look at the last 10 people recently hired. How many are suspects that made it past the HR lineup and have gone on to commit administrative, educational, financial, performance, policy related, or structural crimes that forced you to work twice as hard?

Freedom Rider: Should We Want a Black President?

I Want You
Is Barack Obama more worthy of Black "loyalty than any other Democrat?" The answer is no - Black America should not "purchase a lemon" just because the "seller looks like us." Obama has mastered the fine arts of bullshitology, while avoiding issues of core concern to African Americans in order to make white people feel comfortable. Although no worse than Hillary Clinton, Obama is no better either, on war, health care, the economy, mass incarceration or affirmative action. Why should Black America vote for a man who proclaims "there is no Black America?"


Battle Call

Image
Battle Call
When facing a compelling goal; it is nearly impossible to remain discouraged. The theme of the movie TROY speaks to 1) the battles we fight, 2) why we fight them, and 3) for whom we fight.

Hip Hop Ain't Nothing But the Young People's Blues

Hip Hop
Around the turn of the century some 119 years ago, Dr. W.E.B. DuBois, a Harvard-educated Black scholar, was shocked at the impoverished blues he found in a distressed Philadelphia community inhabited by Blacks: "Murder sat at their doorstep, police were their government, social and academic paucity prevailed, and philanthropy dropped in with periodic advice," wrote Dr. DuBois. If he was alive today, Dr. DuBois would be even more appalled by the sheer mass of distressed Black communities that still suffer from the exact impoverished blues he witnessed some 119 years ago.